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20121010
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politics happens the morning after the morning after. so, i think -- hearing talking about the election. i don't know how the election is going to come up and make no predictions but i do ask myself if romney gets smashed i don't think the political problem is we have a center left problem and we have a far right party that is a structural problem. the republican party has gone nuts in my view. they've been at war -- there's been a simultaneous -- they've been simultaneously at war with physics at the same time. on the deficit and biological l2 mac, some of them for sure. so the question to me is what happens the morning after this election if romney loses. he wasn't far right enough. i wonder if the morning after the morning after. people would say we have gone too far to the right and we need a different republican party which i think the country desperately needs because it needs to be center-left and it's the only way we agree to get big compromises on these issues. >> can i add the role of history suggests the clinton and ronald reagan the second term as the productive term, the big a
to seem unless the debate set the presidential election. it's clear the spt heading toward a environment he has a advantage. romney is going to be exceptional. >> tune in. >> fiewn in and watch. let watch. >> i'm excited. >> talk about in next week in class. >> would you taunt the cross road different and you engage in more localized races congressional and senate how you choose your priorities since so you have a broader scope. >> yeah. that's a good question. we're focused on the presidential election and goal to beat president obama and elect a new president. we are heavily invested in the senate and house race. thing a way about the -- [inaudible] i don't think priority u.s.a. for example -- restore future exclusively dedicated. we're focused on all of the senate races or where you're going do see a lot more of the advertising early your on in the senate races, the bigger the office, the more people pay attention. the we'll be engaged in a number of house races probably a little bit later as we get closer. >> yeah. that's the other thing. the cross roads place outside role in the sen
. >> the important discussion today. >> many of you know that jon huntsman was elected governor of utah in 2004, when he compiled a very distinguished record. he oversaw major tax and health care reform and also major improvements in public education. following his service as governor he was appointed by president obama as the ambassador to china in 2009. he left that position to run for president and gained tremendous respect for his forthright discussion of important policy challenges. this fall, governor huntsman actually joined the brookings institution as a distinguished fellow, so we are pleased to call in our colleague. bart gordon is a practicing attorney and partner at k&l gates and also a distinguished fellow at the council on competitiveness. bard is a former u.s. representative from the state of tennessee. he served in congress for 26 years from 2007-2010 he served as chairman of the house committee on science and technology. bard is working with the brookings institution to improve public sector leadership as part of our new initiative on improving leadership and management. bill kristol
referendum, upon which parliamentary elections were held which were open to multiple political parties, and now i tell you that syria is continuing to work with the patriotic elements in the opposition to build a new and pluralistic syria that meets the aspirations of its people. syria, at the same time, is determined to carry out its duties and to protect its people from jihadists and takfiri terrorism, which armed terrorist groups are using to spread chaos and create sedition among syrians and threaten their peaceful coexistence. mr. president, we heard from this podium, and on other platforms, some calls that were made by those who are ignorant of the fact or maybe ignoring them, or maybe contributing to their spread, calling on the president of the syrian arab republic to step down. this is blatant interference in the domestic affairs of syria, and the unity of its people and its sovereignty. the syrian people and only the syrian people are authorized to choose their own future and the form of their state, which accommodates all groups throughout the entire spectrum of the syrian p
adjustment in that. so i mean, i hope that the outcome of this process, once the elections are over are linked more to the financial structures into any other constitutional issues. >> but how will that complicates spain's relationship with the rest of europe and particularly economic support from the rest of europe? >> i don't think that at this point in time there are any advances being challenged yet so i don't see any and for this relationship to be changed under circumstances. i don't see any reason for your tv can earn. i mean, it has not areolas.com. >> question appear. >> hi, nancy donaldson with the ils. i am curious about what you would say about the youth unemployment situation in spain and what is the role of the private sector in helping to tackle these issues and especially companies like yours and others in a better position than done. >> i'll start with the last part of your question. a number of persons that could work in the bank, and also our young people to be employed in companies with the assistance, so we have a part of this effort in order to address this iss
, nonliberal, not conservatives. the challenges facing their last election, a challenge from the raid. it does affect how you can behave in the senate to some degree. and we have seen that with both parties. so it seems to be getting worse and harder other than people making it easier. >> let me just make two points. one is let's not forget that 2009 and 2010, the democrats had majorities in both houses of congress. they were vetoproof purity of that stimulus package, obama cared, dodd-frank, the institution of the united states are too big -- are not too big to fail. so they had two years and they had majority for two years and they ran things through with all due respect. we were never consulted about obama cared. we were never consulted about the stimulus. we were never consulted about dodd-frank. we all have to work together between 2009 and 2010. amendment 2010 elections were rejected and if we hadn't had candidates in three swing states, we probably would've been the majority in the united states senate. when i look at all the polarization to work with me for two years. the citizens unit
in the elections of the group of strategists and campaign consultants. this is hosted by the eagleton institute of politics at rutgers university and it is 90 minutes. [inaudible conversations] >> yuriko. technology, technology. hi, good evening. i am with bendel, director of the eagleton institute of politics here at rutgers university and it is my great pleasure to welcome you to this evening special event. this is just one of many exciting events that we planned for this fall and i encourage all of you. i know many of you are in the class and there's many people to pick up the flier outside the room with details about upcoming programs. in particular want to mention that on monday, october 15 will be presenting nbc political director chuck todd at the campus center and there's still time to sign up for that event. and of course for the others. some of you may not realize that you are actually attending a session of a course. the course is called political campaigning. that has been taught at the eagleton institute of policy for more than two decades. it has always been taught by a bipartisan
facing a third party candidate in the 2012 election. then live coverage from denver, colorado, for a campaign rally with republican presidential candidate mitt romney. later, president obama rallies with supporters in las vegas. >> tuesday british labour party leader ed miliband delivers remarks in manchester. we'll have live coverage from england here on c-span2 starting at 9:15 a.m. eastern. also tuesday on c-span2, a look at what happens to individual taxes if the bush era tax cuts expire. former congressional budget office director douglas holtz-eakin and other economists look at the issue. our live coverage from the urban institute here in washington, d.c. starts at noon eastern. >> every generation through our history has worked and sacrificed to leave a better country to their children and grandchildren and future generations. we, we were then spending their money, we are now even more, much more, spending their money, and we are leaving them a mess that will be a very difficult to deal with, and if we are that weak, just think of who wants to come here first and take u
'm talking about the election. here i think the question really is i don't know how the election is going come out. i make no prediction. i ask myself if romney gets smashed, if he gets smashed, it would -- i happen to think the political problem in the country we have a center left party and we have a far right party. that is a structure problem. the republican party has gone nuts in my view. >> analytical judgment. [laughter] >> they've been simultaneously they have been at war with mas and physics at the same time. [laughter] on the deficit, it was, you know, deficit doesn't matter. and yeah and biology too a guy in missouri too. so the question to me is what happens the morning after the morning after the election if romney loses? the morning after they'll say it wasn't because he wasn't far night enough. i wonder the morning after the morning after. a lot of people say we have gone too far to the right. we need a different republican party. we need a center right republican party. i think the country needs. because it needs to be a check on the left and the center left, and it's the
in the election of 1956. ben hogan for president. if we are going to have a golfer, let's have a good one. [laughter] eisenhower was franklin roosevelt's first choice to command the d-day invasion. eisenhower had three amphibious landings under his belt at that time. he got along well with the british and was churchill. that was very important and professor roosevelt there was no question he was going to pick eisenhower although he gave general marshal the opportunity to accept -- text to command the invasion if he wanted and eisenhower was characteristic, self disciplined, refused to express an opinion and president roosevelt selected ike. no one else could develop the western armies together as he could and his decision to land on d-day in spite of the weather caught the germans totally by surprise. they had no idea that innovation was coming. can you imagine 5000 ships in the english channel and the germans not knowing it because of the weather? that happened. the decision to want to take pairs with ike's decision, to take paris was his decision as well. they were to bypass pairs and c
or became. um, the big issue, the big change began in 1980, of course, with the election of ronald reagan because ronald reagan brought with him to washington, um, a very underrated figure in recent american history, someone who i don't think gets his due as an important person, and that's edwin meese. because edwin meese at first as an adviser and then as attorney general said, look, there has been a liberal ayen da at the supreme court -- agenda at the supreme court, there needs to be a conservative agenda at the supreme court. what was that agenda? expand executive power, end racial preferences intended to assist african-americans, speed up execution, welcome religion into the public sphere and, above all, um, reverse roe v. wade and allow states once again to ban abortion. a big part of the reagan revolution, um, was the arrival in washington of a group of young and committed conservative lawyers who wanted to work in that, on behalf of that agenda. who were two of the best and brightest of that group? john roberts and samuel alito. 197 finish -- in 1985 in a memo plotting litigation
to the election of president obama and the real energy he brought on the campaign trail in 2008, to the question of transparency and the kind of good government i think we all envisioned. from my perspective, from about 2010, that energy at kind of dissipated. a lot of efforts have gone toward a lot of things, and we weren't seeing that sort of dramatic transformation that a lot of us can visualize. we can imagine knowing what the power of data is but it wasn't happening very much. and that caused me to do some work that i will describe your that results in some grades that i will talk about. grading is a cruel art but it sometimes is necessary art how we communicate things. what he did is i looked at the problem of sort of lacking transparency efforts around 2010, and it looked to me like maybe the transparency community have not communicated well enough to the government side. what it was we wanted. a lot of efforts have gone up if it didn't have a direction, didn't have a destination. and so i sat down with some technical people, i'm a lawyer so i have to go back and learn about how these com
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12